Simon Siabod Publishing

Y Canolbarth Panorama

Authors

Anthony Bloor grew up in Wales and the West Midlands. He was a student at University College Swansea in the 1970s, where he began a degree in English, changed course, and graduated with a degree in Pure Mathematics. While doing a day job as a computer programmer, he worked with Roger Hewins to set up a filmmakers co-operative at the Birmingham Arts Lab and received several awards from the Arts Council and regional arts associations for avant-garde and independent filmmaking. After working in various capacities in film and television, he returned to higher education, doing research in artificial intelligence and then, working with the Writing and Publishing Set at Middlesex University, doing research on the use of computers for the teaching of writing. He is the author of a study of fiction writing, published by the Edwin Mellen Press, New York, in 2003.

Novels by Anthony Bloor

The Big Wheel
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To read Anthony Bloor on The Big Wheel, click here.

Larry’s Lessons
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To read Anthony Bloor on Larry’s Lessons, click here.

The Messenger
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To read Anthony Bloor on The Messenger, click here.

On social media, Anthony Bloor says:

“I resisted social media for a long time, holding the view that it was all a bit frivolous and a major distraction from writing. I finally joined Twitter towards the end of 2012 and still find it a mixed bag of pros and cons. For a start, the whole thing seems to be focused on followers, but unless you're a celebrity you can only increase your followers by increasing the numbers that you're following which means - if you're a compulsive reader - you have to plough through thousands of tweets a minute. I do wonder how many people actually read tweets. There are more people out there trying to sell you things than there are people looking to buy things, so the whole thing is unbalanced. I spent the first twelve months conscientiously reading tweets but it just became very time-consuming. It is a useful source of news and information I find, but I've fallen into the habit of using it for campaigning rather than marketing and I do feel strongly on certain issues such as human rights, access to the legal system, poverty and social injustice. So you're just as likely to find tweets on those kinds of issues as well as tweets on other subjects including football, computing and literary matters. If you like social media, you're welcome to follow me on Twitter.”